Course Offerings

Current Global Campus Courses


Spring Term 1 (January 5 - March 1)

An overview of the New Testament, including an emphasis on the distinctive message, historical setting, and theological contribution of each book. Geographical and archaeological support for each book is also considered.

Hide description.

A survey of the books of the Old Testament covering the period from Solomon through the post-exilic prophets. Attention will be given to the distinctive message and major features of each book with an emphasis on the events leading up to Israel’s captivity, as interpreted by the prophets, and on the nation’s return from exile. Special consideration will be given to the prophetic expression of hope with respect to Israel’s future. This is the second of two courses that together provide a survey of the entire Old Testament. The present course will cover the content of 2 Kings through Malachi in the English Bible, with the exception of 1 Chronicles, Job, and Psalms, which were dealt with in BT 102.

Hide description.

An introduction to the critical reading and writing skills essential for success at college. EnglishComposition aims to prepare students for college in two ways. One, students will learn the essential writing skills needed as they start college. We will learn to do academic research, to build an argument from research and integrate it into a paper, to structure a paper and use transitions to guide readers through it, and to explain ideas in detail and with clarity. As students learn and practice these skills, they will be equipped to successfully complete upper-level writing assignments. Two, students will learn the critical thinking skills needed to as they leave college and assume responsibilities in their jobs and communities. Our world is dealing with some serious issues right now; to help students develop a thoughtful, well-supported opinion on these issues, we will read a mix of news articles and essays and discuss these in light of a biblical worldview; we will also research and write about these issues. Ultimately, students will have an opportunity to stake out a position on the important issues their communities are wrestling with and explain their position with grace and truth. My hope is that they become thoughtful, reflective people, able to engage the world from a Christian point of view.

Hide description.

This course addresses the basics of attitude and conduct that are in harmony with the Christian faith, and how these relate to one’s view of reality. The practical outworking of aspects of the doctrine of sanctification will be studied and worldviews which differ from the Christian one will be considered along with how they affect thought and practice.

Hide description.

A detailed study of the book of Psalms. Emphasis will be given to the different types of Psalms and the various elements of their poetry and structure. Selected Psalms will receive in-depth study in order to understand their message, their theology, and their practical lessons. An inductive and conceptual study of the Book of Proverbs with special attention being given to the nature of wisdom literature, literary forms and features, particular contribution to God’s revelation and its practical benefit to the believer’s daily life.

Hide description.

Spring Term 2 (March 2 - April 26)

An examination of the major facets of culture, including production, economic, kinship, political, social, religious, and marriage systems. Special attention is given to the nature of a worldview, and the elements involved in effecting transformation.

Hide description.

An exposition of Paul’s First Epistle to the Corinthians with careful attention being paid to the argument of the book, its problem passages, and its contribution to New Testament church practices.

Hide description.

This course is designed to develop a theology of culture, to demonstrate awareness of cultural differences, to investigate theories of Christian cross-cultural counseling, and explore counseling issues in the Western and Non-Western worlds. Attention is paid to crosscultural issues as we counsel concerning the well-being of people, counsel concerning Christian conversion, counsel concerning growth and the development of a Christian lifestyle, and counsel concerning Christian service.

Hide description.

Summer Term 1 (May 4 - June 28)

A detailed study in the life of Christ. The chronological and geographical aspects of the Lord’s ministry will be stressed as He offers the Kingdom to Israel with its subsequent rejection. A term project tracing the geographical and chronological movement is required.

Hide description.

Developmental psychology studies the continuous process of human growth and development throughout the lifespan. This course will utilize a Christian worldview to examine the major theoretical perspectives that pertain to the biological (bio-social), cognitive, psycho-social, and spiritual changes from conception through death. Students will consider the biological influences (such as genetics), the environmental aspects (such as parenting techniques or the cohort effect), and the Christian theological propositions (such as the imago Dei) that shape who we are as individuals. Developmental disabilities and the effects of atypical development are considered but not emphasized.

Hide description.

This course undertakes a biblical examination of four areas of Christian theology: (1) Theology Proper—the study of the doctrine of God, including theism and trinitarianism; (2) Angelology—the study of the existence, nature, activities and destiny of holy as well as evil angels including Satan; (3) Anthropology—the study of the origin, nature, and calling of man; and (4) Hamartiology—the study of the doctrine of sin, including its definition, character, and its role and impact on human individual and corporate life. Variant teaching and historical developments in understanding of the doctrines will also be addressed as appropriate.

Hide description.

This course covers the development of the West from the birth of civilization to the start of the Enlightenment (1700s). Topics include the region/countries of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome. A brief look at the Protestant Reformation and Renaissance will conclude the course. An important part of the course is the establishment of a model on how to conduct historical inquiry.

Hide description.

This course undertakes a biblical examination of two areas of Christian theology: (1) Ecclesiology—the study of the nature and character of the church in its universal and local aspects, its function and calling, and its destiny; and (2) Eschatology—the study of God’s program for the culmination of history, including the Rapture, the Great Tribulation, the Millennium, and divine judgments. Variant teachings and developments in understanding of the doctrines in the course of history will also be addressed as appropriate.

Hide description.

Summer Term 2 (June 22 - August 16)

This course undertakes a biblical examination of three areas of Christian theology: (1) Christology—the study of the person of Christ, including discussion of his deity, humanity, and the hypostatic union; (2) Pneumatology—the study of the Holy Spirit, including consideration of his personhood, deity, and ministries; and (3) Soteriology—the study of salvation, including the atonement, election, justification, and saving faith. Variant teaching and historical developments in understanding of the doctrines will also be addressed as appropriate.

Hide description.

A study of the expansion of the church from Jerusalem to the whole Mediterranean area. Special emphasis will be given to church principles, transitional problems, and missionary principles. The character and work of Paul is enlarged to include details from his writings.

Hide description.

An introduction to the Great Commission, the biblical and theological foundations of the Gospel, and the practical implications of these for every Christian. Practical assignments help students become bold, articulate, and creative in sharing their faith.

Hide description.

This course covers the development of the West from the birth of civilization to the start of the Enlightenment (1700s). Topics include the region/countries of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome. A brief look at the Protestant Reformation and Renaissance will conclude the course. An important part of the course is the establishment of a model on how to conduct historical inquiry.

Hide description.

This course is designed to expose the student to a wide range of general mathematics with a desire to help them develop and appreciation for the beauty of mathematics, and the value of mathematical thinking. Problem Solving and Critical Thinking skills, along with the use of technology, will be emphasized and reinforced throughout the course as the student becomes actively involved in solving applied problems. Topics to be covered include: Algebra review, Problem Solving, Sets, Logic, Numeration Systems and Number Theory, Equations and Functions, Basic Geometry, and Basic Statistics.

Hide description.

View Course Textbooks

Educating and equipping learners to impact the world for Christ.

 2570 Asbury Road
   Dubuque, IA 52001

 (563) 588-8000

 info@emmaus.edu