Table of Contents

 

Canada – Quebec


 

Brethren assemblies first appeared in Quebec in the late 1850s or shortly thereafter. These were associated with the ‘exclusive’ groups. Lord Adelbert Percy Cecil ministered among such until his death in 1889.

 

Open brethren assemblies appear to have sprung up in Montreal about the turn of the century. The earliest of these assemblies were English-speaking. The first traces of an effort to establish an assembly testimony among the French Canadians date from the 1870s. Not until the mid-1920s, however, was a sustained effort put forth by persons connected with the brethren movement to evangelize the French-speaking population of Canada.

 

The evangelical revival in Quebec that occurred during the days of the converted priest Charles Chiniquy in the latter half of the 1800s, had practically died out by the 1920s. Opposition to the Gospel was at its peak. In those days Quebec was in the grip of the Roman Catholic Church. French Canadians saw the Church as part of their cultural heritage and identity. Any who abandoned it were said to be abandoning their own people.

 

Louis Germain had worked among French Roman Catholics on the Gaspé Peninsula as early as 1911, distributing literature and speaking to the people amidst great persecution. In 1927, after fourteen years abroad as a missionary in other countries, he returned once again to Quebec.

 

John H. Spreeman is considered by many to be the father and first pioneer of brethren assemblies to the people of French Canada. In December 1926, commended from Toronto, he arrived in Quebec at a time when there was almost no witness to French Canadians. Both the French Canadian people and the government of Quebec were solidly Roman Catholic and that church was as intolerant of other religious beliefs and of allowing its people to read the Bible for themselves as it had been at the time of the Reformation.

 

Mr. Spreeman endeavoured to spread the Word through tract distribution and street preaching in Montreal, Sherbrooke and other cities, but the work was difficult, especially in the first six years. G. G. Johnston and Russell Harris spent some time with him. Tracts were distributed in towns and cities, but there was little desire to hear the truth of the Gospel, and John Spreeman at times found himself in prison for preaching on the street.

 

About this time, in the northern Lac St-Jean region of Quebec, an unpopular priest had been causing considerable difficulty for some of the parishoners in the area of Girardville. One of the men had recently obtained a New Testament and found many things in it contrary to what he had been taught. Some decided to advertise for a Protestant minister to come to Girardville and preach what the New Testament taught. John Spreeman spoke French and responded to this appeal. In the spring of 1933 he went with Noah Gratton to take the Gospel to Girardville.

 

On the first Lord's Day after they arrived, the whole community gathered in the unused Roman Catholic chapel and heard the two brethren expose the folly of worshipping Mary. This met with a mixed response – some opposed the Word, others began to see the light, and all were quite unsettled from their old beliefs. For weeks the two missionaries travelled up and down the community, holding little meetings in homes, working with men in the fields, and everywhere preaching the Gospel.

 

The priest was very active in the meantime, and stirred up considerable opposition. This came to a head when a group of armed men kidnapped Spreeman and Gratton, destroying their Bibles and literature, and drove them out of the district with many threatenings. However, they were back again in the summer of 1934 and this time had the joy of baptizing a number of believers, and of gathering about a dozen Christians for the Lord’s Supper. This Girardville Assembly, the Église des frères chrétiens de Girardville, was the first French assembly in the Province. It continues to this day.

 

All schools in Quebec were either Roman Catholic or Protestant. In Girardville, there was no Protestant school, either English or French at this time.  However, by 1936 there were enough Christian families in Girardville to justify a government grant for a Protestant school. The school was organized in 1936 and a school house was built in the following year. Miss Leila Boyd of Toronto was the first teacher in the Girardville school.  Arnold Reynolds also taught in this school.  A second school began in Rollet in 1941.

 

In 1934, there were three French assemblies in Quebec. Growth was slow but steady, punctuated by sporadic persecution. Two assemblies in the Lac St-Jean region carried on courageously in spite of a campaign of opposition mounted against them by the local Roman Catholic clergy. Two more French_speaking assemblies developed, at Rollet (1942) and Sherbrooke (1946). The Spreemans, the Emmanuel Laganières, the Arnold Reynolds’ and the Norman Buchanans all helped in its early days.

 

In 1936, Arthur Hill set up a medical practice in Sherbrooke with a view to helping the French work. God used him first to establish an English work there, known as Grace Chapel. At the same time, he began efforts to develop a camp work, which became known as Frontier Lodge.  The publication News of Quebec was founded in 1944 by Arthur Hill as an annual report on assembly missionary work among French Canadians. Subsequent editors have been Arnold J. M. Reynolds and Richard E. Strout. It is now a trimestrial magazine, giving news of assembly missionary work among the French population of Quebec.

 

Bethel Bible School (Institut Biblique Bethel) was started in 1948 at Sherbrooke. Students came to learn French, but a small number of French Canadian Christians attended to get Bible training. Bethel Bible School came into being when Miss Dorothy Kenyon, along with Arthur Hill and others, became burdened about a training center for French Canadian workers. A 90_acre farm was purchased in 1948 on the eastern edge of Sherbrooke, not far from Lennoxville. The following year Mr. and Mrs. Walter Angst of Emmaus Bible School in Lausanne, Switzerland, joined Miss Kenyon, and a three_year Bible program was inaugurated.

Mr. Angst was the director for the first 21 years of the school’s existence. In 1972, the leadership passed to Sheldon Bard, then to Richard Strout (1975 _ 1977), to Norman Buchanan (1977 _ 1984), to Homer Payne (1984 - 1989), and ultimately back to Richard Strout. In 1992, the entire operation was turned over to Word of Life Fellowship, whose international headquarters are in Schroon Lake, New York. Norman Buchanan and Walter Angst of the Bethel staff spent most weekends ministering in the French assemblies.

 

Assemblies in Quebec in the mid 1950s were small, with one or two exceptions – more like

mission stations than full-grown assemblies. Most built their own chapels – necessary because it was practically impossible to rent premises for Gospel work anywhere in the Province. The French Canadian workers themselves could look for very little support from these assemblies. Their support had to come from outside the Province.

 

The Roman Catholic church left the stamp of its control on every phase of public and private life. For example, Mr. Walter Angst was unable to post a simple announcement in a French newspaper. In 1956 an evangelical broadcaster succeeded in getting a French program on a station in Quebec City, but after a few weeks the station had to yield to pressure and discontinue the broadcast.

 

From five established assemblies in 1946, the work nearly tripled by 1956. The new assernblies were in Cap_de_la_Madeleine (1948), Chicoutimi/Arvida (1949), La Tuque and Shawinigan (1950), Quebec City and Thetford Mines (1951), and Granby and Drummondville (1952). In the late 1950s, the largest of these was the assembly at Cap-de-la-Madeleine.

 

By 1956, there were 14 French Christian assemblies in Quebec, with a total of about 400 believers. Tens of thousands of Gospel tracts and offers of New Testaments were sent out into Quebec by believers in the Toronto assemblies, other parts of Canada, and the United States. They covered the Province many times, enabling the pioneers of the Gospel to make contacts. This was an excellent way of reaching Roman Catholics in their homes; these were forbidden to enter a non_Roman Catholic place of worship.

 

After the war, assembly work in Quebec was subjected to increased persecution. At Drummondville, demonstrations involving blaring horns and banging pots and pans disrupted meetings.  Paul Boèda was arrested at Cap-de-la-Madeleine and fined for having used a public address system to announce the Gospel. The radio program at Sherbrooke was ejected from the air in the spring of 1950. John Spreeman and his wife were forcefully driven out of Thetford Mines, an incident that seriously affected Mr. Spreeman's health.

 

In March 1950, Paul Boèda had been forcibly escorted from Shawinigan Falls, a predominately French Canadian city of 25,000, by a small unidentified group, taken to Trois Rivières 20 miles away, and placed on a train for Montreal. However, he returned shortly. The Christians didn’t try to find the abductors, but neither did the police. The brethren in Sherbrooke and Montreal tried to get the press to retract their inflammatory articles about Mr. Boèda, with little effect.

 

In April 1950, a mob wrecked the rented hall where the new assembly in Shawinigan Falls was meeting.  The group consisted of  about eight families. The attack occurred during a meeting of the assembly. No one was reported injured, but damage to the building and cars was extensive.

 

Joe Darling and his wife Gertrude, commended from the Grand Haven Gospel Chapel, MI in Michigan, carried on this work in homes while Paul Boèda and his wife rested from the ordeal of the ruined hall. Sheldon Bard convinced the saints that they should not go to law, believing that the attack would work to the furtherance of the Gospel. His assessment proved correct, for after that, new Gospel opportunities opened in Quebec, and the local saints got another hall. The Supreme Court of Canada passed down a decision that non_Roman Catholic religious activities must be permitted everywhere in Canada, and mob persecution quieted.

 

Some 30 commended workers were laboring in French in the Province in 1956. Wider doors were opening in a quietly changing Quebec. Public education was removed from the control of the Roman Catholic church and placed in the hands of the government. Children of converts could now attend Catholic schools without undue persecution and indoctrination in Catholicism. The assemblies blanketed the entire Province with literature through Quebec’s Every Home Crusade.

 

Publications Chrétiennes was established in the late 1950s by Norman Buchanan in a corner of the basement of the chapel at Cap-de-la-Madeleine. It started with one man and a small press, but rapidly grew. Message de Vérité (Message of Truth), its monthly publication, presented the Gospel regularly and in a variety of ways. Its chief purpose was for follow_work and for mass distribution.

 

Glad Tidings began in 1955 as an English_speaking radio broadcast directed by Robert McLaren and serving northern Ontario. In 1961, with the arrival of Gaston Jolin, the ministry was expanded to include French_speaking programming. A French television broadcast was added in 1964 to reach into Quebec. By 1969, all English_speaking broadcasts were discontinued and efforts were concentrated in French radio and television

 

The Sermons from Science pavilion at the 1967 Montreal World’s Fair was a watershed event in the history of Quebec evangelization. Thousands of souls were saved. Among others, Arnold Reynolds, Sam Coppieters, and Fernand Saint_Louis were all active at the pavilion. Christian Direction Inc. was formed at that time as an umbrella organization for the Sermons from Science ministry. It was under the direction of assembly workers Keith Price and later Glenn Smith. New radio and television programs were born in this period. Fernand Saint_Louis began a radio program in 1963 at Montmagny, followed in 1972 by a TV program from Montreal.  But most important was the personal witnessing of the growing number of believers.

 

A corporation known as The Christian Brethren Church in the Province of Quebec was set up in 1942 to serve as a necessary legal body, representing the interests of the assemblies in Quebec.  Conseils et services missionnaires (CSM), a branch of  Missionary Service Committee, Toronto, was formed in 1984 for channeling funds and stimulating missionary interest. Programme de formation pour les assemblées chrétiennes (ProFAC) was begun in 1995 for the training of assembly leaders. CARO (Conférences d’anciens, de responsables et d’ouvriers) was begun in 1998 for the purpose of bringing workers and assembly leaders together for an annual conference. 

 

Assembly camps include Frontier Lodge on the Canada-U.S. border (1936), Joli_B in northwestern Quebec (1963), Parkside Ranch near Sherbrooke (1964), Camp Brochet near Chicoutimi (1967), Camp Joie-de-Vivre in the Gaspé (1975) and Villa Carmel (1995) in the vicinity of Trois-Rivières.

 

French assembly efforts have also been established outside of Quebec, in Northern Ontario at Timmins (1968) and Hearst (1981), as well as in the neighboring province of New Brunswick..

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Having surveyed assembly work in Quebec in these general ways, we turn now to specific assembly histories. We begin in the Montreal area; the English-speaking assemblies are treated first, then the French-speaking.

 

The original English work in Montreal was associated with the efforts of J.N. Darby, who made several visits to the city, beginning in 1859. The first of these assemblies eventually met on City Counsellors Street.

 

One of the earliest ‘open’ assemblies, whose specific beginning is lost from memory, met at 2481 St. Antoine Street in Montreal. It consisted of a number of local brethren as well as a number from the British West Indies. At some point, the work divided, with the more conservative element moving away. In 1926, several years later, that group established their work at the Park Extension Gospel Hall in Montreal (see below).

 

Meanwhile, the more open group continued meeting at St. Antoine Street. The area had deteriorated somewhat and the white believers found it increasingly unattractive. The assembly amicably divided, many of the believers moving into the Draper Avenue Gospel Hall in Montreal (see below). These continued for some time to help financially with the original work. Some time after 1955, the land where the St. Antoine work stood was expropriated and the assembly purchased an unused church building in Westmount, now known as Bethel Gospel Chapel.

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Draper Avenue Gospel Hall, the outcome of the above amicable division, first located in the Notre Dame de Grace district of Montreal. Later they moved to Côte St-Luc and took the name Côte St-Luc Bible Chapel. They continue to meet today on Lansdowne Avenue in Westmount as the West End Christian Fellowship.

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Park Extension Gospel Hall in Montreal began in 1926 when a brother whose occupation was installing gasoline pumps saw the need for a Gospel testimony in the territory surrounding Montreal. The initial purpose of this testimony was to carry out farm_to_farm and village_to_village visitation with the good news of Jesus Christ. These English_speaking workers also attempted to distribute French literature to the French communities, but encountered severe opposition and were prevented by newly passed laws from conducting a French work.  When John Spreeman and Noah Gratton began French work in Quebec, they made this assembly their English base of operation. 

 

In the mid 1950s, the assembly, often referred to as the North End Assembly because of its location in the northern part of the city, was the largest in Montreal. There were some 100 in fellowship, all English, and they conducted an annual Bible conference. The assembly later moved into a former Anglican church building on Ogilvy Avenue and changed its name to Ogilvy Avenue Gospel Hall. The assembly now meets as Grace Gospel Hall in Ville St. Laurent.

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Rosemount is a district of Montreal having a mixed population of English_speaking and French Canadians. In 1945, two assemblies were in Rosemount, one of them French_speaking, formed in the early 1940s. The English assembly, Ebenezer Gospel Hall has been in existence since 1928. Ebenezer was located in the heart of the English_speaking population and situated opposite the Rosemount Protestant School, one of the largest schools in Quebec.

 

Alfred P. Gibbs had two weeks of meetings with children in 1945 and each night the hall was filled. At that time, John Dawson and George H. Dixon were the elders. In 1953, the assembly moved into a new chapel at 2900 Rosemount Boulevard, Montreal. Ebenezer Gospel Hall at that time had about 40 or 50 in fellowship along with a progressive children’s work. The assembly later relocated to 6000 13th Avenue in Rosemount as Ebenezer Gospel Chapel. Today it is a thriving assembly known as Rosemount Bible Church.

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In the late 1940s, an assembly meeting at Bethel Chapel in Pointe Claire was started in Pointe Claire, a suburb on the west end of the island of Montreal. It prospered and when the building could no longer accommodate the numbers then attending, a group of about 160 people left Bethel Chapel to establish a new work called Westview. This was in 1985. Bethel Chapel continues as a strong assembly.

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The Westview Bible Church first met in rented quarters in Dorval, a southern suburb of Montreal. Joseph Kass, a chairman of the elders at Bethel Chapel, resigned in order to help establish the new assembly. The Westview assembly subsequently moved through other locations, and in 1987 purchased a six_acre lot further west on the island in Pierrefonds. Here they built a chapel with a 500_seat auditorium and a full gymnasium.

 

The leaders at Westview Bible Church have included Richard Kimoff, Roy Hoffman, David Knight, Robert Reynolds, John Kelsall, Rowland Phare, Ted Kass, John Reoch, Don Liesemer, and Joseph Kass. Westview Bible Church holds two Sunday morning services, one being a mix of traditional and contemporary styles, at which up to 150 attend. The second is more contemporary, and approximately 400 attend that service, including a significant number of seekers. Over two-thirds of the congregation are under 35 years of age. About 30 to 40 people, a mixture of believers and seekers, have attended the Alpha program of Gospel outreach, in which a number have been saved. The Lord’s Supper is celebrated each Sunday evening, once a month on Sunday mornings, and small groups are encouraged to Remember the Lord in their homes for those who don’t come to the other services. The church is involved in a number of parachurch ministries, such as Intervarsity, Youth for Christ, Hockey Ministries, On Rock Ministries, and MAP International.

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In Verdun, a suburb in the southwest of Montreal, Hebron Gospel Hall existed for many years in a store-front on Wellington Street.  It has since ceased to function.

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We move now to the French assemblies in the Montreal area.

 

The Assemblée chrétienne du centre-sud de Montréal is the continuation of a work begun many years ago by brethren associated with the Park Extension Gospel Hall. John Spreeman and Noah Gratton helped in the early days; Vincent Davies also gave added help. This assembly met initially in the Rosemount district of Montreal and has since moved to several other locations in the city, and continues to the present time.

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The Assemblée chrétienne Maranatha in the heart of Montreal has occupied its present building, a former bank, since 1969. This work was begun through the efforts of Bill and Nadine Learoyd who came to the area in the late 1950s. Since the Learoyds left in 1986, the work has been carried on largely by French Canadian leadership. The Daniel Paquettes were followed by Michel and Diane Lafleur, both couples having been commended by assemblies in the area.

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In May 1982, a new assembly was pioneered in Montreal. This eventually came to be known as the Église évangélique La Source. Leslie Muirhead along with others labored to bring this work into existence and to carry it on. From its inception it was a regional assembly, i.e., its members coming from all over the greater Montreal area. Cell groups were formed to better meet the needs of its scattered members, with all coming together each Lord’s Day for the Breaking of Bread. By the fall of 1991, nearly 150 adults and children were in attendance each Sunday morning. Unfortunately, the work was disbanded in early 1997.

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The Groupe biblique de l’ouest de Montréal, QC began as a house church in 1982.  A number of young families and singles living in the southwest part of Montreal, who were attending the assembly across the river at Longueuil, joined with other believers in the immediate area to begin meeting for the Lord’s Supper.  The work continues today at its present location in Ville LaSalle.  Commended workers Bill and Marion Snyder gave many years of labor to this work.

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We now leave Montreal and consider assemblies around the Province, beginning with the English-speaking.

 

The assembly at Grace Chapel in Sherbrooke was begun in 1940 at 489 Montreal Street, principally through the efforts of two medical doctors, Arthur Hill and William Klinck, and their families. The Christians moved through several addresses on the same street until the present building at 267 Montreal Street was purchased in 1942. David Long gave a helping hand during and after World War II, conducting a popular and well-attended evening Bible school. A profitable campaign was conducted in 1951 by Ernest Woodhouse. Five weeks of meetings were held with Bram Reed in the fall of 1953. Alfred P. Gibbs was among those whose visits encouraged the growth of the assembly. By 1955, some 100 were in fellowship, with a Sunday school running as high as 250; a Gospel rally on Saturday evenings was broadcast over the radio.

 

In addition to those already named, leadership over the years has included commended workers H. Addison Welch, Arnold Reynolds, Brian Fox, Tom Ryan, and Richard Strout and his son Mark. Grace Chapel carried on regular Gospel services in the surrounding communities including those of Albert Mines and Canterbury. Several area assemblies sprang up due, in part, to the efforts of these believers. The assembly at Grace Chapel participated in the establishment of a Christian campground, known as Frontier Lodge, on Lake Wallace near the Vermont border, about 40 miles south of Sherbrooke. The assembly also participated in the beginnings of two Christian retirement homes in the area – Grace Christian Home and Connaught Home. The assembly has commended workers to Angola, Nigeria, and to French work in Quebec. About 65 adults and youngsters attend Grace Chapel today.

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Huntingville Community Church began in 1955 as a mission outreach of nearby Grace Chapel in Sherbrooke. Huntingville is a village of about 600 predominantly English_speaking people. Meeting initially in the Huntingville Universalist Church building, the assembly now has its own building on Campbell Avenue. Those initiating the assembly were William Klinck, Gordon Wright, Arthur Heath, and Arthur Hill. Andrew Patton was responsible for much of the preaching in the early days. Norman Gentry followed Mr. Patton in that role. Prior to 1964, the nucleus of Christians at the Huntingville Community Church still went to the Sunday evening Lord’s Supper at Grace Chapel; after that they instituted their own Sunday evening Remembrance Meeting, and later changed it to Sunday mornings.

 

As the work grew, the assembly was able to engage a full_time worker. After the Gentrys left, Robert Seale, Leslie Picard, and Mark Strout have served as full_time workers. David Dytynyshyn currently serves in that capacity. Other leadership has included Gordon Warnholtz, Richard Stymiest and Warren Heath. Huntingville Community Church has commended  workers to the Lord’s service in Africa and Madagascar. With several types of programs for all ages, the assembly has an average Sunday morning attendance of about 300.

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In about 1946, Mrs Altheas Young of Stanstead, just north of the Vermont border, was a patient of Arthur Hill. He gave her a Bible and invited her to a gospel meeting at Grace Chapel in Sherbooke. Soon, she and her husband were saved.

 

They commuted 35 miles each Sunday to Grace Chapel. Arthur Hill suggested that they have Bible studies in their home, to be conducted by a number of young men, several from Emmaus Bible School. After two years, in 1948, a hall was rented in the town and an assembly formed – Stanstead Gospel Chapel.

 

Those who initiated the assembly included Harry Pilkington, Lloyd Alan, Sydney Surlander, Roy Langley, Art Chamberlain, Mike Utz, Keith Orr, Joe Wooton, Ed Anderson, Jim Grady, Spencer Dibble, and Gordon Warnholtz. Doris Pitman and Ednas Climber conducted children’s meetings at that time.

 

In 1959, Miss Doreen Neil came from British Columbia to teach in Stanstead. She was instrumental in Lawrence Wallace’s decision to sell his business and come to work in the assembly full time. Believers from adjacent Rock Island and Beebe on the Vermont border, helped. Roy Buttery, while living in Waterloo, would go to Stanstead to give help when he could.

 

In 1960 the assembly had dwindled to a dozen, but subsequently grew to approximately 35 by 1962. They purchased a lot that year on which to build a basement, and later an above-ground auditorium. Mr. Lawrence Wallace conducted a home meeting at nearby Graniteville where each Friday evening 40 gathered to hear the Gospel, many of them teenagers. The work at Stanstead Gospel Chapel carries on today, being blessed by the ministry of the Walter Scott family. The assembly is also known by its French names Assemblée chrétienne de Stanstead and L’Assemblée de Stanstead.

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For several years, David Wilson worked in the village of Cherry River, about 12 miles from Sherbrooke. The Christians there established an English Sunday School and Gospel work in Magog, three miles from Cherry River. They also held children’s meetings and Bible readings in Bolton Centre, some 20 miles away. In 1962, the Cherry River Gospel Chapel, QC meeting in their own building, had 35 in fellowship. On Sunday mornings, the believers from Magog met with the Cherry River Christians for the Lord’s Supper, but for the Sunday School and Gospel services they met in a rented hall. Fred and Jean Warnholtz, in addition to their ministry at nearby Parkside Ranch, have served for many years in this assembly.

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In the fall of 1961, the small English assembly at Ayer’s Cliff in the center of Stanstead county moved to a rented room off Main Street. The four families involved in the work carried on the Sunday School, averaging 40, and Gospel service as well as a mid_week prayer service. Lawrence Wallace, who worked full time in the south end of Stanstead county, ministered at the mid_week meeting. The assembly continues to meet in the Ayer’s Cliff Gospel Chapel, QC at 873 Clough Street.

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The Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec juts out into the Gulf of St. Lawrence for about 200 miles. It is predominantly French, but scattered here and there are communities which originally were settled by the English. Pioneers from the assemblies established little places of testimony in some of these localities on the southern coast of the peninsula.

 

English assemblies were started on the Gaspé Peninsula in the early 1900s. Once there were eight, with another one across the bay at nearby Campbellton, New Brunswick. Gospel radio broadcasts were a feature of the work once radio became popular; George Campbell preached over the air every Sunday. Alex Irvine and Victor Harrington gave full time at Black Cape and Grand Cascapedia, respectively.

 

Eight halls were on the peninsula in 1955. Five functioned as assemblies, and the other three provided places for Gospel meetings when help was available. Each year conferences were held in several of the assemblies throughout the area.

 

By the mid 1900s, many of the English-speaking young people were leaving for other areas. In even greater numbers, French-speaking Roman Catholics were moving in. The population change made serious breaches in the testimony. Only four assemblies still functioned in 1963, while occasional meetings were held in one or another of the other Gospel halls.  Today, only two assemblies remain.

 

For many summers, the French Open_Air Campaigners, headquartered in Sherbrooke, made a loop around the Gaspé coast, preaching wherever a group was found and distributing literature.  Commended worker Cyril Shontoff was very active in this endeavor.

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The Hopetown Assembly was started in about 1895 by brethren McCaffery and Lyman. This meeting was numerically stronger than others in the area but always seemed to lack local gift, and dwindled away as some died and others left the district. When the New Carlisle meeting started, many of the Hopetown group gravitated there.

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Black Cape Gospel Hall started in 1889 in the town of that name on the south shore of the Gaspé Peninsula. B.C. Greenman, E. Lyman, Mr. McCaffery, and Mr. Harvey are those credited with starting the assembly, all of whom had brethren backgrounds. Alex Irvine worked full time there for many years. At Black Cape, as with many of these Gaspé assemblies, the work suf­fered because so many Christians found it necessary to go elsewhere to find suitable employment. In the early 1980s, the Hall was closed and the assembly relocated to Bethel Bible Chapel in nearby New Richmond.

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The Port Daniel Assembly was begun in about 1915 by H. L. Campbell and A. H. Stewart. This was never a strong meeting, and when some moved away and others died, it petered out.

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The New Richmond Assembly was one of the older meetings on the Gaspé Peninsula. It was small in the 1950s but continues to this day as Bethel Bible Chapel. Bethel Bible Chapel has about 40 adults and youngsters in attendance.

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An assembly in New Carlisle began in the 1950s, with George Campbell giving help and carrying on a biweekly broadcast over the local radio station. Initially called the New Carlisle Gospel Chapel, today it has the name New Carlisle Bible Chapel.

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Grand Cascapedia Gospel Chapel which disbanded in the early 1980s, was a hive-off from Black Cape Gospel Hall. Samuel Stewart and Victor Harrington served there for many years. In the 1950s, the only Gospel testimony in the small community of Cullens’ Brook was the Cullens’ Brook Assembly.

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We turn now to the French-speaking assemblies in the remainder of the Province.

 

In the Lac St-Jean area is Albanel. The oldest French-speaking assembly in Quebec was in that town. John Spreeman worked in the area many years. The assembly later moved to Girardville where it continues to meet as the Églises des frères chrétiens de Girardville.

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The beginnings of the Assemblée chrétienne de Sherbrooke were modest. The first meetings as an assembly were held on the first Sunday of January 1946. Less than a dozen persons, of whom several were newly converted, met in various homes on Sunday mornings. After that they met for a short time in the basement of Grace Chapel. As the work grew, it became difficult to have two meetings going on simultaneously in the same building and so the French assembly rented space over a store on King Street in the downtown area, and then met on Belvedere Street for a short time. Among the pioneers were Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Reynolds.  Others have followed in their footsteps over the years. In 1955, a lot was purchased on Desormeaux Street in the east end of Sherbrooke and the present building was erected with the help of Stewards Foundation. In 1996, 50 years after the beginning, some 160 adults and children were in regular attendance. The assembly continues to meet at the same location.

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The Assemblée chrétienne de Cookshire was begun in 1977 as a hive-off from the assembly in nearby Sherbrooke.  Growth at the latter had reached such proportions as to necessitate this move. Commended workers Richard and Virginia Strout, together with André Roberge and Lawrence Fortin and their wives, led in the new effort. Meetings were begun in homes, but soon moved to the gymnasium of the local English school whose janitor was a believer. In 1980, the assembly purchased and moved to its own quarters in the Victoria Hall. At one time, over a hundred were in attendance on Sunday mornings. The assembly, located in a rural setting, still carries on faithfully. Leadership is in the hands of commended workers André and Léona Roberge.

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The Assemblée chrétienne Source de Vie in Lennoxville, near Sherbrooke, began in 1988, having spun off from the Assemblée chrétienne de Sherbrooke. Meeting first on Belvidère Street, it has since moved to rented space in the United Church at 6 Church Street, its present location. Those starting the assembly were Pierre Pellerin, François Audet, Homer Payne and Leigh Clarke. Norman Buchanan and Arnold Reynolds have since served as elders. Many of the assembly returned to Assemblée chrétienne de Sherbrooke in 1995, which sent out a call for help. Source de Vie benefits from the ministry of commended workers in the area and now has about 30 adults and children in attendance.

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In 1946, a tract distribution campaign in the town of Cap-de-la-Madeleine offered a free New Testament to anyone who requested one. About 100 responded, and Paul Boèda, Noah Gratton, and John Spreeman from Montreal came to visit those homes in early 1947. This resulted in the formation of the Assemblée chrétienne de Cap-de-la-Madeleine, meeting in the home of Fernand and Yolande St. Louis. Dorothy Kenyon and Elsie Scott were actively involved in the beginning of this assembly. After nine months, the Christians were able to buy a small building seating about 40 persons. They affectionately called it “The Shack.” Roland Lacombe was commended by the Assemblée chrétienne de Cap-de-la-Madeleine in 1950, the first French­ Canadian Christian to be commended to full-time work. Since then, Fernand and Yolande St. Louis and others have been to the Lord’s work by the assembly.

 

Paul Boèda and Sheldon Bard were full-time workers in the assembly for about the first ten years. In 1955 the assembly had a fellowship of  about 100. In about 1957, Norman Buchanan came to work in the assembly. Michel Pedneault has been a full-time worker since 1988. Douglas Virgin, Fernand Montplaisir, and Guy Dupont serve as elders. About 400 are in the assembly today.

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The Assemblée chrétienne de Trois-Rivières-Ouest and the Assemblée chrétienne de Grand’mère both came into existence in 1977 as a result of home meetings in these two areas, separated from each other by about twenty-five miles. Marc Champagne, commended to the work by the French assembly in nearby Cap-de-la-Madeleine, was actively engaged in the realization of these new testimonies. In 1979 and 1982 respectively, new buildings were completed for both of the assemblies and the work continues in each to the present time.

* * * * * * *

 

The Assemblée chrétienne de Shawinigan in Shawinigan Falls, 20 miles north of Cap-de-la-Madeleine was established as an outgrowth of the Cap assembly. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Boèda began the work in 1949, followed soon by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Darling. The Shawinigan assembly began about 1950. Almost immediately these Christians came under persecution, for when 10 fellow-believers from the nearby Three Rivers/Cap-de-la-Madeleine area joined them for a meeting, a mob attacked and greatly damaged the building they were in. For a long time the assembly was unable to get a meeting place, so they met first in a rented basement and then in the Darling’s kitchen. In 1954, Mr. Darling obtained permission to build a chapel at 1894 St. Laurent Street. Persecution continued from neighbors objecting to their presence and by physical damage to the building. Gradually the tension abated, but many years passed before any neighbors began attending the fellowship or any were saved.

 

Among the first saved in Shawinigan were Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Legendre. Mr. Legendre became

a forcefu1 speaker. Mr. Beaulieu, a barber, was saved at the time of Mr. Legendre's untimely death. His shop became a place where the Gospel was promoted. Arthur Legendre’s son Denis later became an elder, shouldering most of the responsibility in the assembly. Other leaders in the early period were Emile Ricard, Jules Juneau, Antoine Beaulieu, and René Bellemare. Gospel meetings with John Spreeman, Noah Gratton, and Vincent Davey were held in the early days.

 

The Darlings continued as full_time workers at Assemblée chrétienne de Shawinigan through 1986. Since 1988, Jean and Liliane Lépine have served full time at the assembly. Guy Bourassa serves as an elder along with Denis Legendre and Jean Lépine. The assembly currently sponsors an annual youth conference, attracting nearly 300 young people. About 170 adults and youngsters attend Assemblée chrétienne de Shawinigan today.

* * * * * * *

 

Roland Lacombe served the Lord in Quebec beginning in 1952. He had come to the Lord in 1948 at the assembly in Cap-de-la-Madeleine. Three years later, he started in the ministry that God had reserved for him in the small town of La Tuque, about 100 miles north of Cap-de-la-Madeleine. There he distributed New Testaments. The transition from Scripture distribution to an assembly of believers was an arduous one. Preaching the Gospel in French was opposed by police,

magistrates, and religious leaders in attempts to stifle the Gospel. In spite of opposition, a brethren assembly was founded. Paul Boèda also helped in the ministry. Today the Christians at the Assemblée chrétienne de La Tuque have their own chapel, built in 1961, and carry on a good work.

** * * * * * *

 

Drummondville is a sizeable city south of Trois-Rivières. The assembly there was started by James B. Howitt, who spoke only a little French but desired to start a French_speaking work. When two married couples from the Cap-de-la-Madeleine assembly moved to Drummondville in 1951, a Remembrance Meeting began in one of their homes. However, by 1953, both couples had moved to Richmond, and J.B. Howitt was alone once again. He invited Roland Lacombe, who was evangelizing in La Tuque, to come to Drummondville for door_to_door visitation and literature distribution. Several people were converted as a result of this effort, and in 1954 Mr. Lacombe moved his family to Drummondville. The revitalized assembly met in his home.

 

The assembly grew and in 1955 purchased a small country school building, 24 feet by 36 feet,

which they moved on to their property. The Assemblée chrétienne de Drummondville still meets at this location. By 1958, the building was too small and was enlarged to accommodate 125 benches. It was often filled.

 

Permission was secured to distribute pamphlets in mail boxes, and these seeds brought forth fruit. Numerous answers were received, which opened doors for visitation. Two politicians, well-known in the town and with good reputations, accepted the Lord and soon lost interest in politics. The members of the political party accused Mr. Lacombe of hypnotizing them and caused him many difficulties, hoping that he would leave town. Not having succeeded, they threatened to throw him in the river. Not only did they not go through with their project but the leader of the group accepted the Lord, and several years later Mr. Lacombe’s son married his eldest daughter.

 

A division in 1965 left the assembly significantly smaller. Roland Lacombe moved to Sorel after the division and began a successful assembly work in that town. The Assemblée chrétienne de Drummondville continues to this day. About 20 adults are in fellowship. Commended workers Donald Cox and Wilfred Buchanan both spent time at the Drummondville assembly. Normand Gosselin is the current full-time worker.

* * * * * * *

 

Following ministries in La Tuque and Drummondville, Roland Lacombe and his wife moved to Sorel, on the St. Lawrence River, northeast of Montreal. In November 1966, the Assemblée chrétienne de Sorel first met to remember the Lord in the basement of the house in which the Lacombes then lived. Many were saved at the opening of the assembly, and seven of the newly converted were baptized.

 

In 1984, the assembly purchased the Lacombe house with the agreement that the Lacombes could

continue to live upstairs. In 1995, Mr. Lacombe, then widowed, moved to his son’s home. The believers demolished the upper story and built a large chapel, which was opened in June 1996.

 

Roland Lacombe was in leadership until the late 1980s. Since 1986, commended worker Jean_Pierre Cloutier along with Jacques Bussières have been elders. Jean_Marc Joyal has worked faithfully in the assembly since its inception. Jean_Pierre Cloutier was first commended by the assembly for work in the eastern part of the province; however, since 1986 he has worked full time in this assembly. Over 100 adults and children attend Assemblée chétienne de Sorel.

* * * * * * *

 

With the encouragement of Samuel Clark, a meeting began in 1951 in the home of Archie Lloyd in Roxton Pond, near Granby, halfway between Montreal and Sherbrooke. This was the beginning of the Assemblée chrétienne de Granby. Christians from Farnham helped, and the Assemblée chrétienne de Cap-de-la-Madeleine sent encouragement in the persons of Paul Boèda and Alphonse Lacombe.

 

Raymond Taylor, after his studies at Bethel Bible Institute in Sherbrooke, came in 1952 to stay with the Lloyds, his aunt being Wilda Lloyd. He started a Sunday School on Sunday afternoons in the home of the Alberts at Roxton Pond, which was received with enthusiasm. When Mr. Taylor married and returned to Sherbrooke, Gerard Lacombe and his family moved to Granby and picked up the Sunday School work, holding it in his apartment at the corner of Ottawa and Elgin Streets in Granby. Raoul Auger joined the group at this time.

 

The Lacombe apartment soon was too small for the growing assembly, and in 1953 the Christians constructed a chapel for Assemblée chrétienne de Granby at 324 Denison Ouest. The official opening was in May 1954. Among the first families in the assembly were those of Barabé, Beaulieu, Deschènes, Harvey, Lacombe, Eveline Langevin, Lehman, Lloyd, Taylor, and Tétreault. Roland Lacombe (a brother of Gerard), Roger Dupont, Samuel Coppieters, and Claude Vachon have served as elders. About 100 are in the assembly today.

* * * * * * *

 

After John Spreeman's wife died, he remarried and moved to Farnham, near Granby in the southern part of the Province, where a group of Christians from Girardville had begun a little assembly. What began as the Salle Evangélique is now the Assemblée chrétienne de Farnham.

* * * * * * *

 

Groupe biblique du Richelieu in Beloeil has its roots in home prayer meetings beginning in 1976.  From that group of 15 adults, most of whom were attending Groupe biblique de la Rive_Sud at Longueuil on the south shore of Montreal, the assembly was begun in 1980 through the efforts of Fernand and Yolande Saint_Louis and Leslie Muirhead. Elders over the years include Fernand Saint_Louis, Leslie R. Russell, Marcel Larin, James Copeland, Philippe Klopfeintein, and François Cholet. Groupe biblique du Richelieu meets in a school on Sundays, has commended a worker to the Lord’s work in France, and consists of about 20 adults and children. Fernand Saint_Louis is known for his French_speaking radio program “La Foi Vivifiante,” which is beamed throughout the French_speaking world.

* * * * * * *

 

French_speaking believers began meeting in homes in the Quebec City area about 1951, seeking to follow the New Testament pattern. At that time they were known as Assemblée chrétienne de Québec. With the help and encouragement of Christians in Toronto, the assembly built a chapel in 1953 seating over 100. Paul Boèda and Alphonse Lacombe helped regularly. Raymond Taylor moved to Quebec City in 1955 to help in visitation and ministry.

 

The building was used for about 20 years and then sold. A more functional building was erected  in 1974 in Sainte_Foy, a suburb of Quebec City. The assembly became known as Assemblée évangélique de Ste_Foy. Through the years many have been saved in connection with the gathering at Sainte_Foy. Several Africans studying at nearby Laval University have been saved, and gone on for the Lord in their native African countries. About 120 people attend Assemblée évangélique de Ste_Foy at 3033 rue Dompierre.  Jean-Paul Berney has been used of the Lord down through the years in connection with this assembly.

* * * * * * *

 

In the early 1970s, several families living on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River, across from Quebec City, came to know the Lord and began to fellowship with believers at the Ste-Foy assembly. The latter being located on the north shore, much travel was entailed. Beginning in 1983, assembly meetings were held on the south shore in rented quarters at Saint-Romuald. Following several fruitless searches for a suitable meeting place of their own, the brethren purchased a lot in the nearby town of Saint-Jean-Chrysostome. In 1992, the Assemblée évangélique de la Rive_Sud moved into their new building.

* * * * * * *

 

Montmagny is 30 miles east of Quebec City. Fernand Saint_Louis, a graduate of Bethel Bible School, moved there to follow contacts established through literature distribution. He and his wife established an assembly testimony there in 1962, called the Assemblée chrétienne de Montmagny. The meetings were in their home until 1965, at which time the Christians built a chapel. Fernand and his wife left Montmagny in 1972.  Since that time, René Lavoie has provided leadership for the assembly. Today the assembly consists of a handful of adults.

* * * * * * *

 

The work in Rivière-du-Loup, located east of Quebec City on the way to the Gaspé Peninsula, was begun in 1975 with the arrival of Joseph and Jessie Tremblay. This brother, a converted Roman Catholic priest, carries on a French radio ministry which over the years has reached many with the Gospel. The Assemblée chrétienne de Rivière-du-Loup meets in the Tremblay home.

* * * * * * *

 

Ste-Anne-des-Montes is on the St. Lawrence Seaway, close to the Gaspesie Provincial Park on the Gaspé Peninsula. Jack Kimple and Donald Cox preached in that area in 1970. The Assemblée chrétienne de Sainte-Anne-des-Monts was begun in 1972. Donald and Beth Cox were God’s instruments for the beginning of that work. Gaston Jolin’s TV show Parole de Dieu was also of benefit in getting the assembly started. The Cox’s were followed eight years later by Jean and Lilianne Lépine, who had just completed a year of study at Bethel Bible Institute. The assembly moved from house to house until 1982 when the Christians were able to rent space. In the 1990s, the believers purchased and currently meet in their own building.

 

Those in leadership over the years include Robert Baronet, Donald Cox, Norbert Chabot, Mare St-Laurent, Yvan Gaudreauet, Jacques Collin, Jean Lipine, and René Lepage. About 45 adults and young people are in the assembly.

* * * * * * *

 

Chicoutimi is a city 130 miles north of Quebec City and east of Lac St-Jean. Roy and Evelyn Buttery came to the region in 1960, having been commended in 1956 to the work in French Canada. After some 15 years of Gospel pioneering activity, they began an assembly in the basement of their home in Chicoutimi in 1977. The assembly was called, then as now, the Église évangélique de Chicoutimi.

 

The growing assembly moved to rented quarters in 1979, then to larger quarters again in 1981. In 1984 they moved into their own building at 265 Malraux. Others involved in the start_up of the assembly were Claude Boucher and Renald Landry.  Leadership has been shared by Roy Buttery, Jean Claude_Gaudreault, Jean_Marc Petit, and Pierre Munger. About 250 adults and youngsters are in the assembly. This and other assemblies of the north_central part of the Province have established and maintain Camp Brochet, a year_round Christian camp on the lake.

* * * * * * *

 

In 1948, an assembly testimony was begun in the town of Arvida, adjoining Chicoutimi, through the efforts of Sheldon Bard, Charles-Eugène Boulianne, Leslie Russell, and others. Howard Forbes arrived the following year to be followed ten years later by Roy and Evelyn Buttery. An active assembly was formed and a chapel built in 1954. In 1966, the assembly purchased the small Anglican Church building in nearby Kenogami. A large, new building was erected in 1987 to house the ongoing ministry and activities of the assembly, now known as the Église évangélique de Jonquière. Commended workers Don and Beth Cox have labored here since that time.

* * * * * * *

 

In the 1950s, several believers from Girardville moved to the area of Chibougamau in order to find employment. With the encouragement of Charles-Eugène Boulianne, Howard Forbes and Roy Buttery, regular meetings were launched in 1960. Having begun in the homes of believers, the assembly soon moved to a rented basement and then to an unused Anglican Church building, which was subsequently purchased and renovated. Over the  years, and without a resident worker, the Église évangélique de Chibougamau has carried on steadfastly.

* * * * * * *

 

The Assemblée chrétienne de Rollet began in 1940 in a farm house which had been remodeled to accommodate an assembly meeting as well as a school. John Spreeman had come to the area, northeast of New Liskeard and close to the Ontario border, in 1939 to visit those who had requested a New Testament by mail as a result of the tract band coverage. Noah Gratton joined him in 1940, about the time the assembly was formed. The initial believers were almost all converted Roman Catholics. Vincent and Della Davey came later and spent several years helping to establish the assembly. After the Daveys left, Jacques Jolin helped lead the small assembly; then in 1961, Gaston Jolin and his wife came and have ministered there since then. Gaston Jolin has a television ministry called l'Heure de la Bomne Nouvelle, which is broadcast on several commercial stations in French Canada. The assembly assists in the operation of Camp Joli_B, started in 1963, which has a full summer program. Three Jolin brothers have been commended to the Lord's work in Quebec and Ontario by the assembly.

 

The Assemblée chrétienne de Rollet built its own chapel in the village of Rollet in 1966, where it

remains today. About 50 adults and young people are in the assembly.

* * * * * * *

 

In 1988 a new work was launched at Sainte-Marie-de-Beauce, thanks to the initiative of believers meeting at Sainte-Foy and Saint-Romuald, now Saint-Jean-Chrysostome. Donald Cox soon joined the effort and, together with Lawrence Fortin who had helped pioneer the work in Cookshire, meetings were begun in the local school. In 1990, the Assemblée chrétienne évangélique de Sainte-Marie-de-Beauce purchased the former Kingdom Hall and have since seen much blessing upon their efforts.

* * * * * * *

 

Not far from Trois-Rivières is the village of Ste. Narcisse which had a small assembly and a Gospel effort carried on by the Christians at Trois-Rivières. For a time, a small assem­bly south of Sherbrooke at Coaticook met in homes. French meetings were also held at Scotstown. John Samuel Clark worked at the New Brunswick border at a place called Pied-du-lac, where are a number of Christians in this area gathered together in a small assembly. Noah Gratton and Bert Grainger faithfully labored in Montreal, visiting from home to home and reaching out to several towns around. North of Montreal is the small village of Montbeillard. A small French assembly, begun by John Spreeman, was carried on in Montbeillard for some time by Vincent Davey and his wife.

* * * * * * *

 

There about two dozen additional present-day assemblies of French-speaking believers in Quebec for which the necessary historical information is lacking

 

 

Sources:

Looking Backward, Pressing Forward: A Brief History of  the Montreal Assemblies of                   Christians known as brethren, 1860s-1993 by George H. Dixon.

30th Anniversary of God's Faithfulness to Huntingville Community Church, 1955 _ 1985.

Sorel - Dedication of a New Chapel, 1996

Portfolio of Huntingville Community Church, undated

News of Quebec, vol. 41, #1, spring 1986; vol. 41, #2, summer 1986; vol. 41, #3, fall 1986; vol. 42, #1, spring 1987; vol. 42, #2, summer 1987; vol. 44, #2, summer 1989; vol. 44, #3, fall 1989.

Letters of Interest, June 1945, p. 13; September 1946, p. 33; June 1948, p. 19; May 1950, p. 17; October 1955, p. 14; November 1955, p. 7; January 1958, p. 3; June 1962, p. 21; July/August September 1963, p. 8; April 1971, p. 16; September 1973, p. 6; January 1985, p. 8.

            Uplook, January 1980, p. 33.


Index

 

Assemblée chrétienne de Cap-de-la-Madeleine, QC........................................................................................................... 12, 15

Assemblée chrétienne de Cookshire, QC.................................................................................................................................... 12

Assemblée chrétienne de Drummondville, QC........................................................................................................................... 14

Assemblée chrétienne de Farnham., QC..................................................................................................................................... 15

Assemblée chrétienne de Granby................................................................................................................................................ 15

Assemblée chrétienne de Granby, QC......................................................................................................................................... 15

Assemblée chrétienne de Grand’mère, QC................................................................................................................................. 12

Assemblée chrétienne de La Tuque, QC..................................................................................................................................... 13

Assemblée chrétienne de Montmagny, QC................................................................................................................................ 16

Assemblée chrétienne de Québec, QC........................................................................................................................................ 15

Assemblée chrétienne de Rivière-du-Loup, QC......................................................................................................................... 16

Assemblée chrétienne de Rollet, QC..................................................................................................................................... 17, 18

Assemblée chrétienne de Sainte-Anne-des-Monts, QC.......................................................................................................... 16

Assemblée chrétienne de Shawinigan, Shawinigan Falls, QC................................................................................................. 13

Assemblée chrétienne de Sherbrooke, QC........................................................................................................................... 11, 12

Assemblée chrétienne de Sorel, QC............................................................................................................................................. 14

Assemblée chrétienne de Stanstead, QC...................................................................................................................................... 9

Assemblée chrétienne de Trois-Rivières-Ouest, QC................................................................................................................. 12

Assemblée chrétienne du centre-sud de Montréal, QC.............................................................................................................. 7

Assemblée chrétienne évangélique de Ste-Marie-de-Beauce, QC.......................................................................................... 18

Assemblée chrétienne Maranatha, Montreal, QC....................................................................................................................... 7

Assemblée chrétienne Source de Vie, Lennoxville, QC............................................................................................................ 12

Assemblée évangélique de la Rive-Sud, St.-Jean-Chrysotome, QC....................................................................................... 16

Assemblée évangélique de Ste-Foy, QC..................................................................................................................................... 16

Ayer’s Cliff Gospel Chapel, QC.................................................................................................................................................... 10

Bethel Bible Chapel, New Richmond, QC.................................................................................................................................... 11

Bethel Chapel, Pointe Claire, QC.................................................................................................................................................... 6

Bethel Gospel Chapel, Westmount, QC........................................................................................................................................ 5

Black Cape Gospel Hall, QC.................................................................................................................................................... 10, 11

Cherry River Gospel Chapel, QC.................................................................................................................................................... 9

Côte St-Luc Bible Chapel, Montreal, QC....................................................................................................................................... 5

Cullens’ Brook Assembly, QC...................................................................................................................................................... 11

Draper Avenue Gospel Hall, Montreal, QC.................................................................................................................................. 5

Ebenezer Gospel Chapel, Rosemount, QC.................................................................................................................................... 6

Ebenezer Gospel Hall, Rosemount, QC.......................................................................................................................................... 6

Église des frères chrétiens de Girardville, QC............................................................................................................................... 2

Église évangélique de Chibougamau, QC................................................................................................................................... 17

Église évangélique de Chicoutimi, QC......................................................................................................................................... 17

Église évangélique de Jonquière, Kenogami, QC...................................................................................................................... 17

Église évangélique La Source, Montreal, QC............................................................................................................................... 7

Églises des frères chrétiens de Girardville, QC........................................................................................................................... 11

Grace Chapel, Sherbrooke, QC.............................................................................................................................................. 2, 8, 11

Grace Gospel Hall, Ville St. Laurent, QC........................................................................................................................................ 6

Grand Cascapedia Gospel Chapel, QC......................................................................................................................................... 11

Grand Haven Gospel Chapel, MI.................................................................................................................................................... 4

Groupe biblique de la Rive-Sud, Longueuil, QC........................................................................................................................ 15

Groupe biblique de l’ouest de Montréal, QC................................................................................................................................ 8

Groupe biblique du Richelieu, Beloeil, QC.................................................................................................................................. 15

Hebron Gospel Hall, Verdun, QC.................................................................................................................................................... 7

Hopetown Assembly, QC.............................................................................................................................................................. 10

Huntingville Community Church, QC............................................................................................................................................ 8

L’Assemblée de Stanstead, QC...................................................................................................................................................... 9

New Carlisle Bible Chapel, QC...................................................................................................................................................... 11

New Carlisle Gospel Chapel, QC................................................................................................................................................... 11

New Richmond Assembly, QC..................................................................................................................................................... 11

Ogilvy Avenue Gospel Hall, Montreal, QC.................................................................................................................................. 6

Park Extension Gospel Hall, Montreal, QC............................................................................................................................... 5_7

Port Daniel Assembly, QC............................................................................................................................................................. 11

Rosemount Bible Church, QC......................................................................................................................................................... 6

St. Antoine Street Gospel Hall in Montreal.................................................................................................................................. 5

Stanstead Gospel Chapel, QC......................................................................................................................................................... 9

West End Christian Fellowship, Westmount, QC....................................................................................................................... 5

Westview Bible Church, Dorval, QC............................................................................................................................................. 6

 

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